Many times, when I’m on the road lecturing about sleep it’s often a dinner event where I’m on stage and everyone is listening and learning while enjoying a great meal.

This past week I was asked to be the keynote speaker at a full day sleep wellness event put on by Turnburry Corp. in Miami.

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We had a great time, and I also got to see one of my old friends Christopher Lindholdst who was there with his company, MetroNaps. They make cool napping pods that companies put in their corporate offices so people can nap during the day. As many of you know I’m a big fan of napping for productivity! In fact, it’s been shown that daytime napping is an effective method for increasing levels of productivity (not to mention, helping employees get a little rest).

After my lecture, during the Q and A session, I was asked the question, “what is the relationship between sleep and weight loss?”

I have written about this topic many times on my blog and even dedicated my 2nd book to this topic: The Sleep Doctor’s Diet: Lose Weight Through Better Sleep. Now there is new research out that helps us better understand this topic.

The study was published in the International Journal of Obesity and looked at how sleep quality is related to weight loss, not sleep quantity.

As reported in the journal Sleep Review:

The patients followed an intensive intervention program, which included lifestyle changes designed for weight loss. It was based on a low-calorie Mediterranean diet, physical activity, and behavior therapy.

The researchers observed that individuals with highly variable sleep patterns at the beginning of the study lost less weight after a follow-up period of 12 months. What’s more, a high sleep variability and sleeping fewer hours than recommended – less than six hours each day – was associated with a lower decrease in body mass index and waist circumference.

Regardless of whether you’re personally struggling to maintain a healthy weight or not, this study continues to confirm that our bodies respond positively to a consistent sleep schedule with as little variability as possible. If you are continuing to search for answers for your sleep, you can easily say that consistency is one of the primary factors.

That said, where should you start? Maybe a sleep coach or coaching program could be helpful. If you are in the market for sleep coaching, I wrote a great article on what to look for in a coaching program that I think you’ll enjoy reading.

Here are a couple of articles I was quoted in this past week that you might find interesting:

We Tested Anti-Snoring Devices On Our Loudest Friends. Here’s What Worked – Digital Trends

6 Milk Home Remedies You Didn’t Know You Could Use – Bustle

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